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All Vision Alerts

Protective Sunglasses: What to Look For

The right pair of sunglasses can protect your eyes from harmful ultraviolet rays (UV) and high-energy visible (HEV) light -- light from the blue part of the spectrum, implicated in cataracts and retina damage. More...

Cataract Surgery: Things You Might See, Hear or Feel

Advances in cataract surgery have made it faster and safer than before, yet anxiety levels among people anticipating the surgery are as high as ever. In large part, this is because the procedure uses local anesthesia, which means you remain awake for the surgery. More...

New Vision-Monitoring App: How Does It Work?

The Food and Drug Administration recently approved myVisionTrack test for patients with degenerative eye conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and AMD, to allow them to monitor their vision regularly at home. The app tracks results and can automatically alert a physician if a significant change has occurred, enabling the physician to respond quickly with an appropriate therapy. More...

How Does Glaucoma Affect Reading Ability?

Almost half of people with glaucoma report difficulty reading, but the medical literature describing reading ability in glaucoma is limited and often contradictory. Studies of out-loud reading speed -- the typical way reading ability is measured -- suggest that significant deficits are present only in people with advanced bilateral glaucoma. More...

Good News on the IOL Front

If you have astigmatism and need cataract surgery, you’ll be happy to know that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an intraocular lens (IOL) designed for you. More...

Cataract Surgery: One Eye or Two?

For people with cataracts in both eyes, unilateral cataract surgery (surgery in one eye) improves visual functioning. However, the greatest improvement is found in those who undergo second-eye cataract surgery, according to a recent study published in the journal Ophthalmology (Volume 120(5), page 949). More...

Low-Vision Aids: Focus on the E-Reader

Having your eyesight diminish because of age-related macular degeneration or another vision disorder can be devastating. But help is available from vision rehabilitation specialists who can teach you new ways to complete day-to-day tasks, often with the aid of low-vision devices. More...

Driving Safely with Low Vision

True or False? A vision test is required each time a driver renews his or her license. False. Surprisingly, regular vision tests aren't required everywhere. Depending on the state, drivers may go without a vision screening their entire adult life after their initial license application, according to the Vision Council of America. Or they may be required to have a vision test only once every four years; in some states, it's every 18 years. … More...

Making the Home Safer to Prevent Falls

An eye condition that causes low vision -- such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy -- can put a person at increased risk of falling. Treatment of the cause of low vision and the use of visual rehabilitation programs are the first steps to reduce the risk of falls and subsequent injury. However, a number of changes can be made in the home to reduce a person's chances of falling. … More...

Don't Lose Sight of Social Activity

Nearly half of all people with poor vision curtail once-enjoyable activities to avoid falling -- which in turn increases their risk of social isolation, suggests a recent study published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (Vol. 13, p. 7967). More...

Focus on Floaters and Flashes

Many people experience visual floaters or flashes at some point in their lives. Usually they don't indicate a serious vision problem, especially if they've developed gradually and haven't changed much over months or years. But a sudden onset of new floaters or flashes may signal a retinal detachment, retinal tear or other problem involving the retina or vitreous, which requires immediate evaluation and treatment. More...

Caffeine: An Unconventional Treatment for Dry Eye

Caffeine may have benefits that go beyond that early-morning jolt. Researchers in Japan have shown for the first time that caffeine can significantly increase the ability of the eye to produce tears, a finding that could have implications for millions of people with dry eye syndrome. More...

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