Welcome to Johns Hopkins Health Alerts!

"Johns Hopkins Health Alerts is an excellent site and I have recommended it to several of my friends. Thanks again, and keep up the good work!"
  • - D. Ambrosio


This free public service from Johns Hopkins Medicine helps keep you up to date on the latest breakthroughs for the most common medical conditions which prevent healthy aging.

Get the latest news sent straight to your inbox for FREE. Check all the boxes below for the topics that interest you.
We value your privacy and will never rent your email address

Johns Hopkins Health Alert

One Flare-Up May Lead to Another

Comments (0)

If you have a flare-up of COPD, there's a chance you'll have another one within two months, a new study suggests. The study was published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (Volume 179, page 369).

Researchers looked at daily symptom diaries that were kept for at least one year by 297 COPD patients. They found that 27% of initial COPD flare-ups (as opposed to a relapse due to failed treatment of an exacerbation) were followed by a second event within eight weeks. These recurrent flare-ups occurred despite full recovery from the preceding event.

The researchers also found that exacerbations were more common in the winter than in the summer and that "isolated" flare-ups (an exacerbation that was neither preceded within eight weeks nor followed within eight weeks by another exacerbation) tended to be about 25% more severe than the first of a series of flare-ups.

COPD exacerbations can lead to hospitalization, serious complications, and lung function decline. Many patients never fully recover the lung function lost during a flare-up. The eight weeks after a COPD flare-up appears to be a crucial time for monitoring and follow-up to prevent or minimize further events. If you experience a COPD flare-up, stay in close contact with your doctor over the next two months, and quickly report any signs of a new exacerbation to your doctor.

Posted in Lung Disorders on September 30, 2010
Reviewed January 2011


Medical Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute for the advice of a physician. Click here for additional information: Johns Hopkins Health Alerts Disclaimer


Notify Me

Would you like us to inform you when we post new Lung Disorders Health Alerts?

Post a Comment

Comments

Health Alerts registered users may post comments and share experiences here at their own discretion. We regret that questions on individual health concerns to the Johns Hopkins editors cannot be answered in this space.

The views expressed here do not constitute medical advice, and do not represent the position of Johns Hopkins Medicine or Remedy Health Media, LLC, which has no responsibility for any comments posted on this site.


Post a Comment


Already a subscriber?

Login

Forgot your password?

New to Johns Hopkins Health Alerts?

Register to submit your comments.

(example: yourname@domain.com)

Customer Service

Registered Users Log-in:

Forgot Password?

Become a Registered User!
It's fast and FREE!
The Benefits of Being a Registered User

Johns Hopkins’ Lung Disorders Bestsellers

    Treating and Managing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    While COPD is a serious progressive lung disease - it’s eminently treatable. Managing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) gets to the heart of your concerns about living with chronic bronchitis or emphysema, providing the latest thinking on the causes of COPD and the full range of your treatment options - with in-depth discussions of medications, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and surgical interventions. Written by Dr. Enid R. Neptune, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Obstructive Lung Disease Clinic is a must-have primer for patients and families affected by COPD. Read more or order Treating and Managing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)



    2014 Lung Disorders White Paper

    This comprehensive report provides the latest research on the prevention and treatment of the most common lung diseases, including: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sleep apnea, interstitial lung disease, lung cancer, bronchitis, and pneumonia.
    Read more or order now



    The Johns Hopkins Medical Letter: Health After 50
    When you're over 50, it's more important than ever to have access to reliable health information. You won't find a more authoritative source than The Johns Hopkins Medical Letter: Health After 50. Since 1988, we've been publishing accurate, timely advice from our specialists on the disorders that most commonly affect the over 50s population. If you're approaching this milestone in your llife, don't miss this opportunity to take charge of your health. Read more or order now...

Health Topic Pages

  • Health Alert
  • Special Report

What is this?

XML