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Two Hand and Wrist Exercises to Relieve the Pain of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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A reader asks, "I spend many hours on my computer every day and I'm worried about developing carpal tunnel syndrome.  What can I do to prevent it?"  Here are two exercises that may help.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is known for pain, tingling and numbness in the hand and wrist. The condition is caused by compression of the median nerve, which enters your hand through the carpal tunnel -- a narrow passageway formed by bones and ligaments. If tendons in the carpal tunnel become inflamed and swell, they can squeeze the nerve and produce the typical symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Early recognition of carpal tunnel syndrome is important because prompt treatment can help you avoid potential long-term problems such as loss of feeling in some fingers and permanent weakness of the thumb.

To keep your wrists flexible and ease strain on tired wrists, you can try these easy hand and wrist exercises (but don't do these movements if you already have pain or numbness):

  • Grasp the fingers of one hand with the other hand and gently bend back your wrist. Hold for five seconds. Gently pull your thumb down and back until you feel the stretch. Hold for five seconds. Clench your fist tightly, then release, fanning out your fingers. Repeat five times. Then do the same exercises with the other hand.
  • Stand or sit with your elbows close to your waist, your forearms extended in front of you parallel to the floor, with palms down. Make fists with both hands and make circles with your fists in one direction. Repeat 10 times, and then reverse the direction. Next, open your hands, extend your fingers and repeat the entire sequence.

 

Posted in Healthy Living on October 27, 2013


Medical Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute for the advice of a physician. Click here for additional information: Johns Hopkins Health Alerts Disclaimer


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Health Alerts registered users may post comments and share experiences here at their own discretion. We regret that questions on individual health concerns to the Johns Hopkins editors cannot be answered in this space.

The views expressed here do not constitute medical advice, and do not represent the position of Johns Hopkins Medicine or Remedy Health Media, LLC, which has no responsibility for any comments posted on this site.


Very good and interesting insights for people interested in topics

Posted by: leszekmsiakowski@gmail.com | June 12, 2013 6:19 PM

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