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Johns Hopkins Health Alert

Research on Cialis For BPH

Comments (3)

Men who take medication for symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may want to add an erectile dysfunction medication such as Cialis, according to recent research.

The erectile dysfunction (ED) medication tadalafil (Cialis) relieves some of the most bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), according to a recent study reported in The Journal of Urology (Volume 180, page 1228).

After taking no BPH medication for four weeks, 1,058 men were assigned to daily treatment with tadalafil at 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg or a placebo for 12 weeks. Their lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed using the standard International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Men who had taken finasteride within three months or dutasteride within 12 months were excluded from the study.

There was a statistically significant improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms for each tadalafil dose compared with placebo at four, eight, and 12 weeks. At the higher dosages some men experienced backache, muscle pain, and headache, but these side effects were uncommon. Most of the improvements in BPH symptoms occurred by week 8 and were similar to those associated with standard alpha-blocker therapy.

These findings are good news for men who find the side effects of standard BPH drugs intolerable and for those who have BPH and ED. If you fall into either of these categories, ask your doctor if you might be a candidate for therapy with an oral ED drug.

Posted in Enlarged Prostate on April 6, 2010
Reviewed September 2011


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Health Alerts registered users may post comments and share experiences here at their own discretion. We regret that questions on individual health concerns to the Johns Hopkins editors cannot be answered in this space.

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Hello Kokanee, In my opinion the way I understood the article, is you stop what you are taking now and you take only the Cialis.In your case you will have to stop taking Avodart for 12 months before you can start the cialis method.

I am 63 years old and I am also taking Terazosin and Avodart. My doctors want me to have a surgical prosedure to remove part or all of my prostate because I don't void all of my urine. I had these voiding problems for about 10 years. What about you what are your doctors are saying to you? and what is your condition with voiding?

Regards, Meli

Posted by: meli | April 11, 2010 1:08 PM

My appointment with my urologist was today and I asked him about the use of Cialis in conjunction with Flomax for additional relief of BPH symptoms other than that related to erectile dysfunction. He was nodding until I mentioned that only Cialis had been so "approved"; he being under the impression there was no such limitation. He gave me a prescription for Cialis @ 2.5mg/dose and was baffled by the question of whether Flomax and Cialis could be taken "together" inasmuch as how could it otherwise have an ADDitional effect? He emphasized that the dosage of Cialis recommended (2.5mg/day)is not sufficient to alleviate ED.

Posted by: clearair | May 13, 2010 4:54 PM

It turned out that my health insurance won't pay for my Cialis Rx for treatment of symptoms related to my BPH condition even though the prescribed dosage (2.5 mg/day) does not alleviate erectile dysfunction. I was told the reason why is that nothing is to prevent me from taking 4 or more Cialis pills at one time in order to achieve an erection. That is, ED is not covered by my health insurance.

Posted by: clearair | June 13, 2010 4:27 PM

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