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HoLEP vs. TURP for Benign Prostatic Enlargement

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How does holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) compare with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in terms of long-term results? According to a recent study published in BJU International (Volume 109, page 408), HoLEP may stand the test of time even better than transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). HoLEP is a relatively new procedure for the transurethral removal of a prostate weighing more than 100 g (about 3.5 oz.).

For the study researchers followed up with 31 of 61 men who participated in an earlier study comparing HoLEP and TURP. Of the men in the follow-up study, 14 had been treated with HoLEP and 17 with TURP.

Results showed that during 7.6 years on average, virtually no men in the HoLEP group needed a repeat procedure, compared with three in the TURP group. Other benefits of HoLEP were less time using a catheter and shorter hospital stays. There were no differences in side effects or symptoms between the two groups after the first year.

Other studies have also demonstrated shorter catheterization times and hospital stays with HoLEP. The findings concerning the need for retreatment provide further evidence that HoLEP is an appropriate and effective alternative to TURP for some men.

Our advice. If you are a candidate for HoLEP, be sure to consider your surgeon's level of training and experience and make sure you have a thorough understanding of potential benefits and risks of the procedure.  

Posted in Enlarged Prostate on April 9, 2013


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