Welcome to Johns Hopkins Health Alerts!

"Johns Hopkins Health Alerts is an excellent site and I have recommended it to several of my friends. Thanks again, and keep up the good work!"
  • - D. Ambrosio


This free public service from Johns Hopkins Medicine helps keep you up to date on the latest breakthroughs for the most common medical conditions which prevent healthy aging.

Get the latest news sent straight to your inbox for FREE. Check all the boxes below for the topics that interest you.
We value your privacy and will never rent your email address

Johns Hopkins Health Alert

When Should You Have Your First Colonoscopy?

Comments (1)

Colonoscopy is considered the gold standard for finding and removing -- and possibly preventing -- colorectal cancer. It can detect up to 95% of colon cancers and can be used to remove precancerous polyps before they develop into cancer. So it’s important to know when you should begin colonoscopy screening: age 40 or 50?

Current guidelines recommend that colonoscopy screening begin at age 50 for individuals at average risk for getting colorectal cancer. But might we prevent more cancers and save more lives if screening were to start at age 40?

Researchers explored this question by analyzing the results of colonoscopies performed on individuals age 40 to 59 as part of an employer-provided wellness program. During the 27-month period studied, 553 people age 40 to 49 and 352 aged 50 to 59 had a screening colonoscopy. Polyps were removed from 79 people age 40 to 49 and from 56 people in the 50 to 59 age group.

No differences were seen between the two age groups in the polyps' size or location in the colon. However, the researchers did find more advanced neoplasms in the older group than in the younger group -- 3 (4%) and 11 (2%), respectively.

More studies are needed to determine whether screening at age 40 would reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer and be cost effective. For now, doctors recommend scheduling your first colonoscopy at age 50 unless you're at higher-than-average risk for colorectal cancer or you develop symptoms. Study reported in the journal Gastroenterology (Volume 134, page 1311).

Posted in Colon Cancer on July 28, 2009


Medical Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute for the advice of a physician. Click here for additional information: Johns Hopkins Health Alerts Disclaimer


Notify Me

Would you like us to inform you when we post new Colon Cancer Health Alerts?

Post a Comment

Comments

Health Alerts registered users may post comments and share experiences here at their own discretion. We regret that questions on individual health concerns to the Johns Hopkins editors cannot be answered in this space.

The views expressed here do not constitute medical advice, and do not represent the position of Johns Hopkins Medicine or Remedy Health Media, LLC, which has no responsibility for any comments posted on this site.


My GI said that had I had waited until another 4 years until I was 50 years old to have my first scoping that I would have likely received a disturbing pathology report with a less than optimistic prognosis. They found a 2.5cm polyp on my 2nd scoping at the age of 46 (15-20% abnormal rate at this size). First scoping in 2004 or 2005 was normal, too!

I have no known genetic history of GI conditions. Sadly, I do have two people I know who died of bowel cancer in their mid 50's who could have been saved by early detection.

50 is just too late to wait, IMHO.

Posted by: egirl | October 26, 2010 1:34 PM

Post a Comment


Already a subscriber?

Login

Forgot your password?

New to Johns Hopkins Health Alerts?

Register to submit your comments.

(example: yourname@domain.com)

Customer Service

Registered Users Log-in:

Forgot Password?

Become a Registered User!
It's fast and FREE!
The Benefits of Being a Registered User

Health Topic Pages

  • Health Alert
  • Special Report

What is this?

XML